The material was mud

MSE 2nd-year students teamed up and represented the department in the annual Alpha Phi Mud Tug, a muddy tug-of-war competition to raise funds for charity. Neither the mess nor the first-round loss kept the team from having a great time with each other.

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Materials and Welding Engineering Undergrad Student Research

Each year undergraduate students at The Ohio State University have the opportunity to present their research and compete in the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum.

Denman Undergraduate Research Forum

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering is proud to have 17 undergraduate students in MSE and Welding Engineering presenting at this year’s event.

Here are their topics:

  • First Principles Study of Uranium Metal
  • Nanofiber Growth on Metal Oxide Particles for Applications in Gas Sensing
  • Sythesis and Characterization of M-Type Ferrite Magnetic Materials
  • A Silk-Neuronal Biosensor for the Detection of Orexin-A
  • Shrinkage Control in Compacted Graphite Iron Castings
  • High Temperature Carbon Behavior in Dissimilar Metal Welds
  • Resistive Switching in Au-NiO-Au Nanowires
  • Phase Transformation Analysis in Alloy 282
  • Diffusion in Cu-Zn Binary: Physical Metallurgy of U.S. Pennies
  • Resistive Switching Response of TiO2 Nanowires for Memory Devices
  • Development of Synthesis Route for Bulk Sr2NiWO6
  • Phase Transformations in the Intercritcal Region of the Fine Grain Heat Affected Zone
  • Determination of SCTR in Stainless Steel and Ni-Base Alloy Welds
  • Fracture Toughness Prediction for Aerospace Composite Resin
  • Growth of Diamond Nanowires on Silicon Substrate Prepared with Gold Colloid
  • Osteoarthritis and Exercise: A Micro-CT Analysis

Congratulations to all of them for having their abstracts accepted to this prestigious event.  Good luck to all!


On My Way

Here I am, the morning we leave for TMS. I’ve got everything packed up and ready to go, and yet here I am, awake at 7:00 AM. I guess I’m looking forward to this trip a bit more than I thought. It’s definitely been a long week leading up to TMS, and who wouldn’t be excited for a trip across the country with 40 of their close friends?

I do hope we get a lot of free time this year, it doesn’t look like we will but if last year is any indication then I should be an expert on Seattle by the time I leave. I always forget the lack of sleep extends the day on trips like this. I’ve mapped out a bunch of landmarks and things to see, trying to get organized about my random wanderings I guess. I hope it doesn’t rain too much but I guess with Seattle that’s asking a lot. The temperature should be nice though, low to mid 50’s during the day with high 30’s to mid 40’s at night. Not exactly warm, but compared to Ohio right now it should be comfortable.

The rain has compelled me to leave my dress shoes out of the luggage, wet walks and leather soles do not play nice. This leaves my semi-dressy shoe options squarely on my distinctly casual, but leather, Merrells. Here’s hoping no one notices.

Mark


Materials and the Winter Olympics

OSU MSE prof explains the science behind hockey’s slapshot: http://engineering.osu.edu/news/?p=929

The Science of Sports

The 2010 Winter Olympics don’t begin until February, but Ohio State’s Kathy Flores, associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering, is helping explain the science of ice hockey in an NBC “Science of the Olympic Winter Games” video series segment.

NBC traveled to Columbus to film Flores explaining the physics involved in the sport of hockey. The segment will be broadcast during the Winter Olympics, to be held in Vancouver beginning Feb. 12. As a warm-up to the Olympics, NBC’s Today Show featured Flores’ hockey segment on their Dec. 9 morning broadcast.

The complete “Science of the Olympic Winter Games” video library is available online at http://www.nbclearn.com/olympics. View the “Slapshot Physics: Hockey” segment to see Kathy Flores explaining why hockey is the high-velocity sport that it is.

Dr. Flores also is featured in the Safety Gear segment.
And learn about the importance of materials in the Science of Skates.


Professional Appreciation

Catching up the blog on activities going on in our department.  It’s been a busy month!

OSU Material Advantage Club in Pittsburgh - 11/26/09

OSU Material Advantage Club in Pittsburgh - 10/26/09

In October, the officers and a few members of OSU’s Material Advantage Club attended the Materials Science and Technology (MS&T) Conference in Pittsburgh.  It was a great opportunity for them to meet and mingle with MSE students from all over the country, attend scholarly presentations, and network with academic and industry professionals.   Next year: Houston!

MSE department faculty at Ohio State always have supported undergraduate students’ efforts to become involved in professional societies and meetings.   To thank the faculty for their monetary and academic support, the MSE Club held a Hats Off to MSE Faculty luncheon.   Students prepared the meal and, while their professors ate, presented a report of the club’s recent activities and plans to attend the February meeting of TMS in Seattle.

Thanks to all.


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